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22 janvier 2005

15 octobre 1945.
L’Amiral S A Robinson pose la nécessité de la création d’une Agence d’Intelligence autonome.

 

Reproduced at the National Archives
UNITED STATES FLEET
HEADQUARTERS OF THE COMMANDER IN CHIEF
NAVY DEPARTEMENT
Int 550/1

FF1/A8
Serial : 002278
UNCLASSIFED

PDF - 146.1 ko
CIA 3d3b

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9 OCT 1945

MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY :

Subject : Intelligence

Reference : a) memo from Admiral S. M. Robinson dated 4 October 1945 on the subject of Intelligence.

1. Admiral Robinson’s memorandum is on a subject of great importance to the Untited States. It is, as he says, most importance that there be provided a proper intelligence department in this Government.

2. As you now, and as Admiral Robinson probably does not know, the Joint Chief of Staff have recognized the inadequacy of present organizations in various Governmental departments and have submitted to the Secretaries of War and Navy their recommendations for the creation of central coordinating authority for the operation of an intelligence service of the United States.

3. It is understood the recommendations of the Joint Chiefs of Staff have been forwarded by the Secretary of Navy and the Secretary of war to the Secretary of State for further trans¬mittal to the President for his information. As you know, this recommendation provides for setting a national intelligence authority composed of the Secretariat of State, War and Navy and ’a representative of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, with a Director of a central intelligence agency appointed by the President and an intelligence advisory board.¬

4. In my opinion, the present unsettled question concerning the reorganization of intelligence activities of the Government should be resolved at the earliest practicable date. I recommend that the Navy Department press far an early establishment of the central intelligence agency along the line recommended by the Joint Chiefs of Staff.


UNCLASSIFED
Reproduced at the National Archives
UNITED STATES FLEET
HEADQUARTERS OF THE COMMANDER IN CHIEF
NAVY DEPARTEMENT
Int 550/2

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10-800
SMR/je 4 october 1945
UNCLASSIFED

MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY

Subjet Establishment of an Intelligence Branch for the United States

As a result of the developments of this war, it is believed that the United States has lost completely its security. It is perfectly possible for us to have the finest Navy, the finest Air Force and the finest Army in the world as still be completely and hopelessly defeated before we can strike a blow.

The two important things for this country after the war
Are :

1) To provide for adequate research and
2) Te provide for a proper Intelligence Department.

You already have underway the first and I believe that the stops you are taking will eventually lend to proper emphasis being place on research. In regard to the second, I can see no moves or plans that in the slightest degree are adequate to handle this situation. The must recent move that I know of has been to set up an intelligence branch in the State Department. This is no doubt a good thing. I believe that the idea is that it will to some extent coordinate the efforts of the War and Navy Department intelligence service as well. I have no comment to make on this arrangement except to say that it is wholly and completely inadequate to supply the Services which I believe to be the most important item in the Government today. We should have an Intelligence Branch which would report directly to the President of the United States, which would obtain its appropriations directly from Congress in a lump sum, and which would net be subject to accounting and which would not be under the Civil Service. The members of this organization would have to be chosen on a permanent basic ; most of its members would have to spend their entire lives in foreign countries. The head of the organization should be the most carefully selected men in the entire Government setup ; he should be given a completely free hand in its organization, and the sole directive of this organization should be to obtain advance information as to what foreign countries are preparing to attack the United States. This organization should not fritter away its efforts by having agents scattered all over the globe but should concentrate on those countries which are able to make

UNCLASSIFED

16,404


Reproduced at the National Archives
UNCLASSIFED
Int 550/2

War against the United States or which may in the near future be able to make war against the United States and especially those whose motives are at the present time unknown. At the moment I would say that three countries qualify for these conditions -Russia, China, and Argentina. The latter is, of course, at the present -moment a weak country but could in a few years be converted into a very powerful one. If our forces are withdrawn from Germany in the near future, that country could undoubtedly have to be added to the list. It may be that in a few years France and Great Britain would also be added to the list. I can conceive of conditions arising in Brazil which would make it necessary to establish agents there, and, of course, the situation in Japan will depend entirely upon how long we occupy it. As time goes on and conditions change, it would undoubtedly be desirable to move agents from one country to another, but in any case we should be sure of having two or three years warning of the intentions of any country with regard to the United States. I do not believe that this is an impossible program nor even a too ambitions one. Other countries do it. I have informed that the Prime Minister of Great Britain has a foreign intelligence branch which reports directly to him. This information was given to me former naval officer. I don’t now whether it is correct or not, but I believe that all country, after this war, will concentrate on developing and perfecting their intelligence systems, and I firmly believe that if this country does not do the same things that we will be destroyed some day by a jealous neighbor and without the slightest warning. There are so many new weapons being produced or perfected that would make this possible that I won’t enumerate them here.

In conclusion, I believe that the most important things now to be done in this country is to establish an independent intelligence agency, the sole purpose of which shall be to keep this country informed or movements of its possible enemies. This agency should not be placed under any Cabinet officer so that it can be submerged when the pinch of funds comes. Also, the placing it under a Cabinet officer is bound to hamper the efforts its chief to attain his goal. The adequacy with we provide this service will probably decide the life of this Nation.

S. M. Robinson
Admiral, USN

10-800

UNCLASSIFED

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